Record

CodeNA11463
Dates1885-
Person NameSecretary of State for Scotland; 1885-
ActivityIn 1707 the parliaments of England and Scotland passed the Act of Union which joined the two nations under the Parliament of Great Britain. In 1709 responsibility for Scotland was given to the Secretary of Great Britain, although this office remained vacant and Scottish affairs were managed by the Lord Advocate of Scotland. In 1782 the Home Secretary became responsible for domestic affairs in England, Wales and Scotland. In 1885 the Scottish Office was established and a Secretary for Scotland was appointed with responsibilities for administering the Scottish legal system, and the Scottish Boards for agriculture, education, local government and health. In 1926 the Secretary for Scotland became the Secretary of State for Scotland and in 1928 the Scottish Boards became departments of the Scottish Office. In 1939 the headquarters of the Scottish Office transferred from Dover House, Whitehall, London to St Andrew's House, Edinburgh. In 1999 the departments of the Scottish Office transferred to the Scottish Executive. The Scotland Office comprising the offices of the Secretary of State for Scotland and of the Advocate General became responsible for the representation of Scottish interests to UK Government. The Secretary of State for Scotland is responsible for the devolution settlement for Scotland as set out in the Scotland Act, 1998, representing the interests of Scotland matters reserved to UK Parliament under the Scotland Act 1998, to encourage cooperation between the Scottish Parliament and Scottish Executive and the UK Parliament and Government and to manage financial transactions such as the payment to Scottish Consolidated Fund amongst other functions. The Advocate General is responsible for advising the UK Parliament on Scots Law, representing UK government in court proceedings in Scotland and other specific functions as set out in the Scotland Act, 1998 (c. 46).
Corporate NameSecretary of State for Scotland
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